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Video: Video: Microscopically reweaving a 1907 painting

To ready Paula Modersohn-Becker's "Self Portrait" (1907) for MoMA's reopening in October, conservator Diana Hartman tackles the question of how to repair holes in the painting’s canvas. She figures out that a curved needle typically used in eye surgery might allow her to avoid removing the work from its original stretcher. And her inventiveness doesn’t end there: Using an adhesive made from a sturgeon bladder, she secures linen thread to the needle to darn the pieces back together with the help of a microscope. Hartman shows how she makes unobtrusive repairs, to keep viewers’ gaze focused on the portrait itself. “Just by doing this treatment,” Hartman says, “we’ve given a breath of fresh air to this painting.” Subscribe for our latest videos, and invitations to live events: http://mo.ma/subscribe Explore our collection online: http://mo.ma/art Plan your visit in-person: http://mo.ma/visit Commit to art and ideas. Support MoMA by becoming a member today: https://moma.org/join The comments and opinions expressed in this video are those of the speaker alone, and do not represent the views of The Museum of Modern Art, its personnel, or any artist.  #newMoMA #MoMA2019 #conservation #paulamodersohnbecker #art #museumofmodernart #moma #museum #modernart
The Museum of Modern ArtArtisanVideosEducationmomamuseum of modern artnew yorkartartistmuseumcontemporaryconservationpaula modersohn beckerpainting restorationart restorationmicroscopicallyconservatorcanvas repairrepairhow to paintmicroscopefemale artistspregnant artist

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Microscopically reweaving a 1907 painting