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Video: Video: How Screws are Made at Continental Screw, New Bedford ~ 1954 NAM; from Industry on Parade

Technology Miscellany playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1A5AECE797B4D332 more at http://quickfound.net Fastener maker Continental Screw Company, New Bedford, Mass., made bolts, nuts, screws, rivets, and washers. From the National Association of Manufacturers "Industry on Parade" newsreel. By 1964, the defunct Continental Screw plant was occupied by a large discount store: https://www.newbedfordguide.com/who-remembers-building-19/2016/01/29 There is a Facebook page for Continental Screw memories: https://www.facebook.com/Continental-Screw-Company-1374657485894189/ Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screw Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ A screw is a type of fastener, in some ways similar to a bolt (see Differentiation between bolt and screw below), typically made of metal, and characterized by a helical ridge, known as a male thread (external thread). Screws are used to fasten materials by digging in and wedging into a material when turned, while the thread cuts grooves in the fastened material that may help pull fastened materials together and prevent pull-out. There are many screws for a variety of materials; those commonly fastened by screws include wood, sheet metal, and plastic... A screw is a combination of simple machines—it is in essence an inclined plane wrapped around a central shaft, but the inclined plane (thread) also comes to a sharp edge around the outside, which acts a wedge as it pushes into the fastened material, and the shaft and helix also form a wedge in the form of the point. Some screw threads are designed to mate with a complementary thread, known as a female thread (internal thread), often in the form of a nut, or object that has the internal thread formed into it. Other screw threads are designed to cut a helical groove in a softer material as the screw is inserted. The most common uses of screws are to hold objects together and to position objects. A screw will usually have a head on one end that contains a specially formed shape that allows it to be turned, or driven, with a tool. Common tools for driving screws include screwdrivers and wrenches. The head is usually larger than the body of the screw, which keeps the screw from being driven deeper than the length of the screw and to provide a bearing surface. There are exceptions; for instance, carriage bolts have a domed head that is not designed to be driven; set screws often have a head smaller than the outer diameter of the screw; J-bolts have a J-shaped head which is not designed to be driven, but rather is usually sunk into concrete allowing it to be used as an anchor bolt. The cylindrical portion of the screw from the underside of the head to the tip is known as the shank; it may be fully threaded or partially threaded. The distance between each thread is called the "pitch". The majority of screws are tightened by clockwise rotation, which is termed a right-hand thread; a common mnemonic device for remembering this when working with screws or bolts is "righty-tighty, lefty-loosey". If the fingers of the right hand are curled around a right-hand thread, it will move in the direction of the thumb when turned in the same direction as the fingers are curled. Screws with left-hand threads are used in exceptional cases, where loads would tend to loosen a right handed fastener, or when non-interchangeability with right-hand fasteners is required. For example, when the screw will be subject to counterclockwise torque (which would work to undo a right-hand thread), a left-hand-threaded screw would be an appropriate choice. The left side pedal of a bicycle has a left-hand thread. More generally, screw may mean any helical device, such as a clamp, a micrometer, a ship's propeller, or an Archimedes' screw water pump...
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How Screws are Made at Continental Screw, New Bedford ~ 1954 NAM; from "Industry on Parade"